The Perfect Blend: Our Syrian Spice Story

If you’ve already mixed up a batch of our Syrian Spice, then you’re familiar with how many components it requires. While today we think of our blend as providing just the right amount of flavor and complexity, quite a bit of trial and error was involved before it was pronounced perfect. Although there are admittedly many ways to make Syrian Spice—each family has their own preferences—this is the story of how 11 ingredients came together to form the proprietary blend we favor.

“The one that they had here in the United States, it was made of seven spices,” recalls Steve. “It was fine, but my father-in-law and I broke it down and added four more spices. That made it 11 spices total. Every few weeks we changed the amount or percentage of each ingredient. We had to use more coriander, or more allspice until we came up with the right blend—60 percent of our Syrian Spice is made up of allspice, coriander, and black pepper. The rest we used in smaller portions—cumin, cardamom, cloves, and so on. To test it we would make Kibby Neyeh, a raw lamb dish—that was the only way you could taste the flavors openly. When we got it perfect, we took the recipe to a spice company and they would mix it for us. That’s what we began to use in all our food. Everybody loved it, so we kept it up. Today, the spice company is still making it and they call it Steve’s Syrian Spice.”

Ready to make your own batch? Click here to get started!

2 Comments

  1. The note below is from a loving friend and family member.

    From: Lisa Thomas-HIll
    Subject: Memories

    Message Body:
    Words cannot describe the joy reading your blog has brought! Preserving not only your recipes but the memories and stories that go with them is a treasure. The story & pictures brought back such wonderful memories of spending time with your family both @ your home and the restaurant – great friends and of course great food! Those memories and the love that Steve and Therese gave me will never be forgotten. Thank you for sharing!


    This e-mail was sent from a contact form on Kalils in the Kitchen (http://www.kalilsinthekitchen.com)

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